In any one day, how all the things get mixed together
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This image shows works being installed for In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a view from the front of the gallery that shows the text written by Sabine Russ, Writer and the managing editor of Bomb magazine.
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a partial view of the exhibition, showing a section of the the 18-foot drawing, Sepenteando en público/bilingual conversations on the far right. The next images will show a few of the individual scroll drawings with some details.
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This image shows Serpenteando en público: Bilingual Conversations a drawing made during an exhibition I had at Instituto Cervantes in NY where I incorporated noise, conversations and interactions with visitors as part of the work. Since the gallery attracted a lot of Spanish language speakers, the first thing I did when visitors entered the gallery was to ask: Español o ingles / Spanish or English? And from that point our conversation would begin in whichever language they chose. The content of these conversations became a part of each day’s work. The entire drawing was made onsite, starting the morning after the opening and ending the final day of the show.
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a view of the first drawing on the left, Terra firma, 2016, 122" x 60".)

The text in the drawing is only legible in certain areas. There are sections where Spanish is mixed with the English. Below are excerpts from parts of the work. (The translations in parenthesis are not in the drawing.)
incertidumbre = uncertainty
uncertainty is not a bad thing – it keeps one from becoming overly confident/arrogant/presumptuous
there is a degree of humility with uncertainty, an awareness that you can’t know as much as you might want to know…

Si no es posible tener las respuestas, por lo menos, una conversación con buenas preguntas…
(if it’s not possible to have the answers, at least, a conversation with good
questions…)
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is the second image from the left, When things that should be connected fall apart, 2015 (150” x 60”)

I write extemporaneously as I draw and through this process I find a line of inquiry for the particular piece. I then re-read it, covering any text that I find extraneous or unnecessary. The editing process creates random shapes of graphite or color in the drawings. I see it as visualization of how much thought is irrelevant and as a way of noticing what is essential in each experience.

An excerpt from the text in this drawing reads:
There is always this desire to know, to know what the next step should be, to know what is best: to do, to say to leave unsaid
To know something, some fact, to know the answer…
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a view of the third image from the left, She was talking on the telephone with the cord curling back on itself tangled, her leg swinging as she doodled with the blue pen; she was smiling, maybe even laughing. 2015, (126” x 60”)

This is a drawing made primarily with a blue BIC pen. I wanted to see how many tones I could make with what is considered a utilitarian object. It’s based on memories of my mother’s doodles.
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a detail of the previous image, She was talking on the telephone with the cord curling back on itself tangled, her leg swinging as she doodled with the blue pen; she was smiling, maybe even laughing.
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is the fourth drawing from the left, There’s always a back-story, 2016, (120" x 60")

I use writing as a way to find my way into the drawing, to consider whatever is going on in a specific point in time and use that as a starting point. This is an excerpt from a part of the drawing:
• Start here: the limitations of words, the way we assign a value to a word/concept:

continuity is good / inconsistency is bad (por ejemplo)
but continuity could just mean you’re moving ahead in the same way you’ve always done before, without much thought or questioning if this assumed “next step” is really where you need to be or – – – – are you on auto-pilot?
Anne Gilman In any one day, how all the things get mixed together

This is a detail from the previous image, There's always a back story
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